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Editorial Styleguide

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

C

campus

Capitalize when used with the full name of the campus: Belknap Campus, Health Sciences Campus, Shelby Campus. Lowercase when it stands alone: The Grawemeyer Award winners visited campus.

campuswide

One word.

CAP

Acronym for the “College Access Program Grant.” Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal usage, CAP is acceptable if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

capitalization

The full, formal names of the university and its colleges, schools and departments are capitalized: the University of Louisville; the School of Music; the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Use lowercase when not using the full, formal name: the university; the music school; the mechanical engineering department.

Capitalize the full, formal names of centers and institutes and use lowercase on second reference or in informal usage: The Center for Safe Urban School Communities helps communities access risk factors for youth violence. The center also promotes the healthy development of young people.

Capitalize the formal names of campus organizations and ongoing programs: Interfraternity Council, University Honors Program.

IN ALUMNI PERIODICALS, capitalize formal programs and activities that are of special interest to alumni: Homecoming; Founders' Day Picnic.

See also buildings , composition titles

Cardinal Bird

The name of UofL's athletic mascot. Do not set off in quotation marks: The halftime program featured Cardinal Bird and the cheerleaders.

Cardinal(s)

The name given to UofL teams that participate in intercollegiate sports. Always capitalize Cardinal(s) but not the rest of the team name: the Cardinal men's basketball team; the softball Cardinals.

catalog

Not "catalogue"

CEHD

Acronym for the “College of Education and Human Development.” Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal usage, CEHD is acceptable if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

center, centre

"Center" is the American spelling; "centre" is British. Always use "center" except when "centre" is part of an official name.

See also theater, theatre

century

Lowercase, spelling out numbers less than 10: the first century; the 21st century. Do not hyphenate: This was a 21st century addition to the university.

See also em dash, en dash

chair

Use the full name and capitalize first reference of endowed chairs: William Ray Moore Chair of Family Practice. On second reference the Moore chair is acceptable.

chair, chairman, chairwoman

Chair is preferred: Jane Smith is chair of the biology department. Do not use "chairperson" unless it is the organization's formal office title.

Challenge for Excellence

Use full name on first reference; "the Challenge" is acceptable for second reference.

FYI: This 10-year strategic plan was initiated by UofL in 1998 and outlines how the university will meet the state legislature's directive (set in 1997 in House Bill 1) to become a nationally recognized metropolitan research university by the year 2020.

city
Do not capitalize in "city of" constructions: city of Louisville.

classes, courses

Lowercase when making a general reference to courses: He studies history and political science. Uppercase when referring to a specific class or when the class name includes a proper noun or numeral, and set off in quotations: I took "Psychology 100" and "Spanish 101."

Clock Tower

A campus landmark. Capitalize.

CODRE

Acronym for the “Commission on Diversity and Racial Equality.” Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal usage, CODRE is acceptable if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

coed

Coed residence halls house students of both sexes, and coed colleges admit students of both sexes. Never use "coed" to refer to a female college student.

collective nouns

The collective nouns "faculty" and "staff" can take singular or plural verbs, depending on whether group members are acting individually or as a group. The French department faculty meets regularly with the Spanish department faculty. The staff sometimes disagree among themselves.

When "data" is used as a collective noun that represents a unit it takes a singular verb: The data is invalid. When it refers to individual items, use a plural verb: The data were collected by a team of biologists.

colleges and schools

The distinction between schools and colleges is, in general, one of breadth: colleges consist of multiple academic units, schools of one or two. Do not call a college a school.

Capitalize the full, formal names of UofL's schools and colleges. If the college is named after someone, include the honoree's last name: Brandeis School of Law. First names and initials need be included only in the most formal settings, such as commencement programs: Louis D. Brandeis School of Law

Where possible, use full names on first reference and informal names thereafter: the College of Arts and Sciences, A&S; the College of Education and Human Development, CEHD.

On first reference for external communications, preface the name of the school or college with "the University of Louisville's" unless the full university name has been used earlier: the University of Louisville's Brandeis School of Law. On second reference, informal names are lowercase: the law school.

Use alphabetical order for formal listings of the university's schools and colleges (dates when units originated are included here, too, for reference purposes):

  • Brandeis School of Law (1846)
  • College of Arts and Sciences (1907)
  • College of Business and Public Administration (1953)
  • College of Education and Human Development (1968)
  • Graduate School (1915)
  • Kent School of Social Work (1936)
  • School of Dentistry (1887)
  • School of Medicine (1846*)
  • School of Music (1932)
  • School of Nursing (1979)
  • School of Public Health and Information Sciences (2002)
  • J.B. Speed School of Engineering (1925)

* Date indicates when UofL was chartered by the General Assembly, absorbing LCI (est. 1837) and the Louisville Medical Institute (est. 1833); a law department also was established at this time.

colleges and universities

For colleges and universities other than UofL, use the full formal name on first reference; abbreviations and acronyms may be used in subsequent references. Beware of mixing up athletic nicknames and academic institutions.

commas

Avoid excessive use.

Do not use a comma before the final conjunction in a simple series: The president delivered an address before an audience made up of state legislators, U.S. senators and local government officials.

EXCEPTION: A serial comma can be used when an integral element of the series requires a conjunction (the departments of history, English, industrial engineering, and molecular and biological medicine) or in a complex series of phrases.

Do not use a comma to introduce a subordinate clause: She decided to take a class in social deviancy because she thought it would help her understand her teenager's request to officially change his name from John to The Son Who Was Formerly Known as John.

Do not use a comma to set off essential information: Harry's daughter Amy is considering switching her major from biology to pre-med. NOT Harry's daughter, Amy, is considering … This implies that Harry has only one daughter when in fact he has three. However, the following is correct: Amy says that her father, Harry, is constantly nagging her to switch her major from biology to pre-med.

DEPENDENT CLAUSES: If the second half of a compound sentence does not contain its own subject and predicate, do not separate the clauses with a comma: The ticket office is in the Swain Student Activities Center and is open from 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

INDEPENDENT CLAUSES: Use a comma between the two independent clauses of a compound sentence (preceding the conjunctions "and," "but," "or," "nor," "for," "so" and "yet"). The second half of the sentence must contain its own subject and verb: The ticket office is in the Student Activities Center, and it is open from 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

DATE: Use a comma between a specific date and year: June 10, 1964. A comma should follow the year when a specific date is mentioned mid-sentence: May 11, 1988, was the date of the party. Do not use a comma between month and year or season and year: March 1997, summer 1999.

LOCATIONS: When using a city name with a state or country in a sentence, place a comma afterward: She is a Louisville, Ky., native.

See also semicolon

commencement, Commencement

Uppercase the formal ceremony; lowercase for generic usage: Maya Angelou spoke at Commencement; UofL holds commencements in December and May of each year.

committee

Capitalize the full names of committees that are part of formal organizations: the Educational Affairs Committee of University Council. Lowercase shortened and informal versions of committee names: The University Council's educational affairs committee will meet Tuesday.

committees, task forces

Capitalize the official names of specific committees or task forces: The Task Force on Gender Equity met yesterday. Lowercase second general reference: The task force is developing a proposal on gender equity.

commonwealth

Do not uppercase in "commonwealth of" constructions: commonwealth of Kentucky.

complement, compliment

"Complement" is something that completes or enhances; "compliment" is an expression of respect or admiration: The black complements the red in UofL's logo. She complimented the university on its red-and-black logo.

composition titles

Capitalize the first and last word of the title along with all verbs, nouns and principal words: A Dog Named Spot. Capitalize all prepositions and conjunctions in a title that consist of four or more letters: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest; The House That Jack Built.

Italicize titles of books, plays, artworks, television shows, radio shows, movies, journals, magazines, newspapers, newsletters, long poems published as books, and gallery and museum exhibitions: The Star-Spangled Banner, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, Gone With the Wind, NBC's Today show, the CBS Evening News, the prime-time sitcom Friends.

Do not italicize shorter works, such as magazine articles and lectures; instead, set these off in quotation marks.

The Bible and books that are primarily catalogs of reference material are capitalized only (no quote marks or italics). This category includes almanacs, directories, dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks and similar publications.

Translate a foreign title into English unless the work is known to the American public by its foreign name.

comprise

Avoid using if possible, but when necessary remember that "comprise" means to contain or include. Use in active voice: UofL comprises 11 schools and colleges NOT UofL is comprised of 11 schools and colleges.

Conference USA

The athletic conference that prior to 2005 included UofL's intercollegiate sports teams. C-USA is acceptable on second reference.

UofL's intercollegiate sports teams are presently included in the Big East Conference.

See also Big East Conference

course titles

In most cases, a description of subject matter rather than an official title will suffice: He teaches freshman English each fall. She developed the course on contract law.

In cases where the actual course title is necessary set off with quotation marks: She taught a popular course for art students titled "The Psychology of Color."

courtesy titles
Generally omitted.

See also titles

CPE

Acronym for the “Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education.” Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal usage, CEP is acceptable if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

cum laude

"With distinction"; lowercase and italicize.

CV

Acronym for “curriculum vitae.” Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal usage, CV is acceptable if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

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