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Editorial Styleguide

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

E

e-mail

Hyphenate. Do not allow an e-mail address to break over two lines with a hyphen; break if necessary using a required soft return following a slash or other mark of punctuation that is part of the address. Position an e-mail address within a sentence so that it does not precede an unrelated and possibly confusing mark of punctuation such as a period: If you have questions about this style guide, e-mail Laurel Harper at laurel.harper@louisville.edu and she will respond.

e.g., i.e

E.g. stands for "for example"; i.e. stands for "that is." The two are not interchangeable.

EEOC

Acronym for the “Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.” Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal usage, EEOC is acceptable if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

EKU

Acronym for “Eastern Kentucky University.” Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal usage, EKU is acceptable if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

ellipsis (...)

Treat an ellipsis as a three-letter word, with a space before and after it but none inserted between the three periods: Metropolitan College … provides both employment and a free college education.

When the ellipsis follows the end of a sentence place a space between it and the sentence's ending punctuation mark: "Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. ..."

em dash, en dash

There are two kinds of dashes—of different length and for different purposes—in addition to the hyphen:

The em dash (—) is named for the amount of space that a capital M occupied in a line of lead type set in the particular typeface. It is used for parenthetical remarks or abrupt changes of thought, epigraphs and datelines. Do not include spaces around the dash: Her research found that this is especially true for women―the vast majority of welfare recipients.

The en dash (–) is shorter than an em dash but longer than a hyphen. It is used for continuing or inclusive numbers or words. Do not include spaces around the dash: pages 7–10; Monday–Friday; University of Alabama–Birmingham.

Do not pair an en dash with the word "from": 1968–72 or from 1968 to 1972 NOT from 1968–72).

An en dash also is used in place of a hyphen in a compound adjective when one of the elements is an open compound: post–Civil War; Grawemeyer Award–winning author, Louisville–Jefferson County government.

FYI: On a PC, you can make an em dash or an en dash when working in Word by:

  • placing your cursor where the mark will go
  • go to Insert in the program menu and open up Symbol
  • highlight the appropriate dash located there
  • hit insert

On a Mac, dashes are made in Word the same way, or simultaneously hit the option and hyphen keys to make an en dash and option/shift/hyphen for the em dash.

You can also create your own shortcuts for the em dash and the en dash on the PC by following the directions in the Symbol section.

emeritus, emerita, emeriti

The title of "emeritus" is not synonymous with "retired"; it is an honor bestowed on a small number of retired faculty and should be included in the title. At UofL this honorary title may be conferred upon a retired faculty member if requested by the dean and unit faculty (or, if permitted in unit personnel documents, by department faculty) and then approved by the president and trustees.

"Emerita" is feminine; "emeriti" is plural. The word may precede or follow "professor": John Doe is a professor emeritus of art. Jane Doe, professor emerita at UofL

entitle, title
"Entitle" means having the right to something: She was entitled to the promotion because she met all the qualifications and had the full support of the department. "Title" is the name of a publication, musical composition, etc.: Her first book, titled The Applewhites of Door County, was an enormous success.

everyday, every day

"Everyday" is an adjective; every day is an adverb: Missing class was an everyday occurrence for her, while he went to class every day.

everyone, every one, everybody

"Everyone" and "everybody" (one word) refer to all people; "every one" and "every body" (two words) refer to individual items.

"Everyone" and "everybody" are singular pronouns, taking a singular predicate: Everyone here is eligible for the new program. Everybody is ready to go.

When "every" is used as an adjective, the noun it modifies always takes a singular verb: Every one of us is a potential candidate for the job. (This is also true of "each," "either" and "neither.")

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