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Editorial Styleguide

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

H

health care

Two words, except when part of a formal name: Advancing health care is a very important part of the university's Challenge for Excellence agenda; UofL Health Care; Norton Healthcare.

Hyphenate when used as compound modifier: She entered the health-care profession to become a hospital administrator but decided to earn a medical degree instead.

HIPAA

Acronym for the “Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.” Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal usage, HIPAA is acceptable if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

his/her

Do not use this construction when trying to be gender sensitive in an article. Instead, alternate between using "his" and "her."

home page
The “front” page of a particular Web site.

Homecoming

Uppercase when referring to the UofL Homecoming event; lowercase for generic usage: He was his high school's homecoming king.

Honors Program

The official name is University Honors Program, but Honors Program also is acceptable. Uppercase. However, "honors classes" and "honors professor" are lowercase.

House Bill 1

Short for the "Kentucky Postsecondary Education Improvement Act of 1997." It is acceptable to use House Bill 1 on first reference as long as it is in a context that clearly explains to readers what the bill is about.

HPES

Acronym for the “Department of Health Promotion, Physical Education and Sport Studies” (in the College of Education and Human Development). Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal usage, HPES is acceptable if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

HSC

Acronym for the “Health Sciences Campus.” Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal usage, HSC is acceptable if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

hyphen

Use a hyphen to avoid ambiguity: He was a small-business man.

Hyphenate modifiers that follow forms of the verb "to be": The cancer program is world-renowned for its innovative treatments.

Hyphenate compound modifiers except when the compound modifier follows the noun: She is a part-time worker. She works part time.

EXCEPTIONS: No hyphen is needed for compound modifiers using the adverb "very" and all adverbs ending in -ly: She was a very qualified candidate. This is not such an easily remembered rule.

However, note that when " family" (which, of course, is not an adverb) is part of a compound modifier, the modifier is hyphenated: family-owned business.

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