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Editorial Styleguide

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N

NEA

Acronym for the "National Education Association." Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal publications, NEA may be used if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

newspapers

In campus publications italicize a newspaper's name.

Capitalize the definite article if that is the way the publication prefers to be known: The Courier-Journal.

However, do not capitalize the definite article in a story that mentions several papers where some papers use "the" as part of their name and others do not: the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Courier-Journal and the New York Times.

Where location is needed but is not part of a newspaper's name, use parentheses: The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer.

NIH

Acronym for the "National Institutes of Health." Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal publications, NIH may be used if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

NKU

Acronym for "Northern Kentucky University." Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal publications, NKU may be used if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

non

In general, no hyphen when used as a prefix: nonprofit; nonentity.

EXCEPTIONS: Use a hyphen before proper nouns and in awkward constructions: non-English speaking people; non-nuclear submarine.

NSF

Acronym for the "National Science Foundation." Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal publications, NSF may be used if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

numbers

Spell out those less than nine; use numerals for 10 and above.

Always spell out numbers at the beginning of a sentence, except for calendar years: Ten years ago today she graduated from Speed Scientific School. 1998 marked the beginning of the Challenge for Excellence plan. (Avoid this construction when possible. Instead: The Challenge for Excellence plan began in 1998.)

Always use numerals for percents, credit hours, ages, parts of a book: 7 percent; 3 credit hours; 2 years old; The information can be found in Chapter 2.

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