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Editorial Styleguide

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

T

task force

If a task force has a formal name, capitalize it: The University Task Force on the Environment will discuss several very interesting issues at its next meeting. If the reference is general or generic, do not capitalize: The university will appoint a task force to discuss environmental issues on campus.

telephone numbers

Use periods to separate area codes and prefixes: 502.852.6171.

Do not use the numeral 1 before area codes, including 800 numbers.

tense

Quote in the present tense for general university publications: "It's a great idea," he says.

Use past tense when a date or day within the story makes it logically necessary: "I want to share several exciting discoveries with you," the doctor said during a presentation to the media last month where he announced the results of his research.

that, which

"That" is used to introduce an essential clause (one that cannot be eliminated without changing the meaning); "which" is used to introduce a nonessential clause: She signed up for the science course that she needed to complete her major. She took biology, which is a course that she needed to complete her major.

An essential clause must not be set off from the rest of the sentence by commas; a nonessential clause must.

that, who

Use "that" when referring to inanimate objects and to animals without a name: She works for the company that pioneered biomedicine. There goes the dog that bit me.

Use "who" when referring to people or to animals with a name: She was the one who started the company. It was Lassie who bit me.

the

Do not capitalize "the" within a sentence unless there is also a change of typeface (e.g., to italics) or a quotation mark to cue the reader: He attended the University of Louisville. She requires her students to read "The Lottery" each year. He subscribes to The Courier-Journal.

While many businesses and institutions capitalize "the" in their name in their print materials we do not: He owns stock in the PepsiCo.

theater, theatre

Use "-er" unless "theatre" is part of the formal name: Classes in UofL's theater program are often held in Thrust Theatre.

FYI: While this can be confusing (especially as UofL's theater department uses the "–re" spelling for its formal name), it becomes much more simple if you remember that the only time the "–re" spelling should be used is for instances in which "Theatre" is capitalized.

time

Use figures except for "noon" and "midnight."

Use a colon to separate hours from minutes: 8:45 a.m.

Use 8 a.m. rather than 8:00 a.m.

Avoid redundancies such as 10 a.m. this morning.

Avoid constructions using "o'clock."

titles

In general, capitalize formal or courtesy titles—president, dean, senator—before names of individuals and lowercase when they follow names. Lowercase descriptive or occupational titles: editor John Doe.

Use full names on first reference. On second and subsequent references, use only last names, without courtesy titles, for both men and women regardless of marital status.

EXCEPTION: To distinguish between a husband and wife quoted in the same story, confusion often can be avoided by using first names: John and Jane Smith collaborated on the study. "We reported our findings at the next conference," Jane says. "It was an interesting session," John adds.

JOB TITLES: Use lowercase for titles unless they are directly before a name and function as part of the name: Dean Joe Jones met with President Brenda Smith to discuss several research issues. Jane Doe, dean of the medical school, also attended.

Do not capitalize titles in generic usage: The deans met with the president.

As a general rule, titles containing more than four words should be placed after the name.

TITLES OF EVENTS: Capitalize, in quotation marks, the full, formal titles of workshops, conferences, seminars, speeches and similar events: A workshop titled "The Use of the Library" will be held next week. Use lowercase for subject matter: Ekstrom Library will offer a workshop on library use.

COURTESY TITLES: In a formal list (of participants or donors, for instance) "Mr.," "Mrs.," "Miss," and "Ms." should be omitted, except when a woman specifically requests to use her husband's name: Mrs. Joseph Doe, Mr. and Mrs. John Doe.

See also academic titles , composition titles

trademark

UofL is a university trademark. Be aware that all university logos and marks are protected under federal trademark law. See the Guide to Graphic Identity for more information.

For other products, when possible use the generic equivalents: facial tissue. If the trademarked name is necessary, capitalize the first letter only: Kleenex NOT KLEENEX

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