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Editorial Styleguide

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

W

Web, World Wide Web

"Web" is an acceptable shorter substitute for "World Wide Web." While at one time "web" was treated as a proper noun when standing alone and, thus, capitalized, it is now commonly lowercased and, in the instance of website, treated as one word.

Do not use "www" as an abbreviation within a sentence; instead, use "the web."

When writing out web addresses, http:// is not necessary, nor is www. Periods may be used at the end of the web address.

On advertising materials, the use of http:// as well as www before a URL is antiquated and unnecessary.

Avoid breaking web addresses at the end of a line.

who, whom

In formal English "who" functions as a subject: Who was that? "Whom" functions as an object: To whom was the package sent? [object of to].

who’s, whose

"Who's" is a contraction: Who's there? "Whose" is possessive: Whose book is that?

WKU

Acronym for "Western Kentucky University." Always use the official name on first reference. On second reference in informal publications, WKU may be used if the meaning will be clear to readers. If you intend to use the acronym on second reference, let readers know this by setting it off in parentheses directly after the first official reference.

Women’s Studies

Capitalize the full, formal name of the program: She is the chair of Women's Studies.

Use lowercase for the subject area: The university offers a certificate in women's studies.

work-study
Of or relating to any of various programs that enable students to engage in part-time employment while continuing their studies.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W


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