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This Week at U of L (Sept. 13–19)

September 12th, 2005

Talks
Lugar to speak for Constitution Day
Panel to discuss young, black professionals
Women’s & Gender Studies: Gender & Reproductive Rights
Faculty Research Forum

Film
International film series begin, continue

Theater
Improv and short plays from Studio Theatre program

Music
Hattie Bishop Speed Series opens
U of L vocal groups to perform joint concert


Talks

Lugar to speak for Constitution Day
The University of Louisville will commemorate Constitution Day Sept. 19 with a special appearance by U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind. The longest-serving U.S. senator in Indiana history, Lugar is the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. His free talk will be at 9 a.m. in Bigelow Hall, Miller Information Technology Center on Belknap Campus. It is sponsored by the McConnell Center for Political Leadership.

Constitution Day is a federally mandated observation to increase awareness of the U.S. Constitution.

Panel to discuss young, black professionals
The second U of L-Yearlings Club lecture series starts Sunday, Sept. 18 with a panel discussion on “To Be Young, Black and Professional.” Sherri Wallace will moderate a panel with members David Anderson, Nilaja Meeks, Jason Buckner and Stephanie Garrett. The free discussion will be from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Yearlings Club, 4309 W. Broadway.

The Yearlings Club was founded in 1951 and is devoted to civic responsibility and community service, primarily in West Louisville. In recent years, the club has sponsored political forums, study circles, community meetings and receptions dealing with issues ranging from drug abuse to political activism.

The goal of the lecture series is to bring U of L faculty together with the African American community to share knowledge, information and insight—and to forge a common bond.

Other Talks

Women’s & Gender Studies Lecture Series: Gender & Reproductive Rights
Independent scholar Rickie Solinger, author of “Beggars and Choosers: How the Politics of Choice Shapes Adoption, Abortion and Welfare in the United States,” will present “Grandma Time, Mommy Time and My Time: Reproductive Politics and Change over Time,” at 3:30 p.m., Sept. 14, in Ekstrom Library Auditorium. Women’s & Gender Studies sponsors a free, public lecture series on one theme each semester. The fall series continues monthly through November.

Faculty Research Forum
Dennis Hall, U of L English professor, will present “Edward Young’s Conjectures on Original Composition (1759) and The Anxiety of Influence” at 3:30 p.m. Sept. 16 in Room 300, Bingham Humanities Building. The Faculty Research Forum is sponsored by the Commonwealth Center for the Humanities and Society to provide a forum for faculty research in the humanities. Talks are free and open to the public.


Film

International film series begin, continue
The public and the university community can see some of the classic and latest films from Latin America and Asia at U of L this week.

The Latin American film festival starts at 7 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 15, in Room 102 of Strickler Hall with “Un oso rojo (a red bear).” The 2002 movie from Argentina tells the story of Oso, an inexpressive, heavyset convict who tries to start a new life after being released from jail.

The film series, which is free and open to the public, continues weekly through Oct. 13. Films are in Spanish or Portuguese with English subtitles. Paid parking is available at the Speed Art Museum. The series is sponsored by the Lewis Fund, Modern Language Fund and the Latin American Studies program.

The Crane House Asian Film Festival continues Sept. 15-18 in Floyd Theatre of the Student Activities Center. Featured films are “S21: The Khmer Rouge Killing Machine,” a documentary that takes two survivors of the 1975-79 genocide in Cambodia back to the Tuol Sleng prison; “Ong-Bak: Muay Thai Warrior,” a young man has to track down the statue of the sacred Buddha statuette Ong Bok, stolen from his village and sold in Bangkok; “Springtime in a Small Town,” a love triangle with a twist, set in China; and “Aparajito,” a young Indian man is forced to choose between staying with his widowed mother and earning an education.

Two or more films will be shown each day. Admission is $6 for each screening, $3 for a weekend pass for U of L students and $5 for U of L faculty and staff. Parking is available on Floyd Street and in the Floyd Street visitor’s parking garage, which is entered from the Student Activities Center oval drive across from Cardinal Park. The film festival is sponsored by the Crane House and U of L’s Commonwealth Center for the Humanities and Society.


Theater

Improv and short plays from Studio Theatre program
The U of L Studio Theatre program will offer two evenings of improv and an evening of original short plays this week.

Performers will team up for on-the-spot comedy and music Thursday, Sept. 15, and Friday, Sept. 16, at 8 each evening. The free performance will be in Thrust Theatre, at the corner of Floyd and Warnock streets.

Original short plays—all written, rehearsed and performed during a round-the-clock marathon that starts Friday night, will be performed Saturday, Sept. 17, and Sunday, Sept. 18, at 8 p.m.

This free event also will be in Thrust Theatre.


Music

Hattie Bishop Speed Series opens
The Pomerium Singers will be the first guests of the Hattie Bishop Speed Series of concerts from the Speed Art Museum at U of L at 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18. The group, which the New York Times has called “one of the finest early music ensembles in the country and perhaps the world,” performs virtuoso choral music of the Renaissance. There will be a preconcert talk at 2 p.m. in Bird Hall, and the concert will be in Margaret Comstock Concert Hall, both in the School of Music Building. Admission is free for members of the Speed Art Museum and $10 for everyone else.

U of L vocal groups to perform joint concert
University Chorus, Chorale and the Cardinal Singers will take the stage together at 8 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 18, in Comstock Concert Hall. The Cardinal Singers, under the direction of Kent Hatteberg, have performed to great acclaim in international venues in recent months. In May, the group won first prize in chamber choir with the first perfect score (25) ever awarded at the Harmonie Festival, Lindenholzhausen, Germany. They captured the Preis des Bundestagspräsidenten der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (Prize of the Bundestag President of the Federal Republic of Germany) for highest score of all choirs; and won a special prize for the outstanding interpretation of a world premiere: “Laudate pueri, Dominum” by Vytautas Miškinis. They also were also designated as “best choir of the festival.”

The Cardinal Singers also won a second prize at the International Chamber Choir Competition in Marktoberdorf, Germany, perhaps the most prestigious world chamber choir competition. Kent Hatteberg was named winner of the Marie Straecker-Daelen Prize, the conductor’s prize for the best interpretation of a contemporary choral work.

The joint performance is free and open to the public.

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